What New York City Can Learn From Its Relationship With The Sea

Second anniversary of Hurricane Sandy

Can New York City survive the sea?

This is the question Ted Steinberg, a Case Western Reserve University professor, poses in his recent book, Gotham Unbound: The Ecological History of Greater New York.

From the days when Mannahatta island was home to the indigenous Lenape tribe to today’s five-borough metropolis that houses more than 8 million people, one thing has remained constant: the story of New York City cannot be separated from water.

The city received a painful reminder of this two years ago when Hurricane Sandy struck the region, killing dozens, causing billions in damage and paralyzing the city’s transportation system. Sandy’s record-setting 13-foot storm surge revealed the vulnerability of Lower Manhattan in an era of rising sea levels.

The Huffington Post spoke with Steinberg about the city’s aquatic history and what the future may hold for Gotham. Continue reading “What New York City Can Learn From Its Relationship With The Sea”

New York City Flooding: By 2050s, 800K NYers Could Be Living In Flood Zone

Superstorm Vulnerable GridNEW YORK — Officials say new projections show 800,000 New York City residents could be living in flood zone that would cover a quarter of the city’s land by the 2050s as rising seas and other effects of global warming take hold.

The number of 90-degree days in the city could double or even triple to echo what Birmingham, Ala., now has. And 8 percent of New York City’s coastline could flood just from high tides. Continue reading “New York City Flooding: By 2050s, 800K NYers Could Be Living In Flood Zone”