Some 40 million US homes at risk from extreme 2022 weather

A more extreme hurricane season than normal could inflict trillions of dollars of reconstruction cost on some 40 million U.S. homes, mostly in New York, Miami and the Gulf Coast. As many as 21 named storms, including 10 hurricanes, could hit the nation this year, property analytics firm CoreLogic said in its annual report, citing a forecast for the June-November hurricane season from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The report analyzed hurricane, storm surge

The post Some 40 million US homes at risk from extreme 2022 weather appeared first on The Real Deal New York.

Mammoth Maui cattle ranch hits market for $75M

Talk about surf and turf! A 3,600-acre cattle ranch on the shores of Maui is hitting the market for $75 million — making it the largest piece of land for sale in the tropical state. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the property, known as Hana Ranch, is on the island’s eastern coast and is adjacent to nearly 100 acres of undeveloped land owned by media mogul Oprah Winfrey. A working ranch with more

The post Mammoth Maui cattle ranch hits market for $75M appeared first on The Real Deal New York.

Life Time Group to manage 120,000 square feet of amenities at Brooklyn’s +1,000-foot tower

New York City’s tallest building outside Manhattan will have plenty of space to work out — and stretch out. The New York Post is reporting the recently opened, more than 1,000-foot-tall Brooklyn Tower has leased its more than two football fields worth of amenities space to Life Time Group Holdings, which will manage the pools, gyms and co-working spaces in the building. Long Island’s (yes, Brooklyn is located there) tallest tower, which uses a portion

The post Life Time Group to manage 120,000 square feet of amenities at Brooklyn’s +1,000-foot tower appeared first on The Real Deal New York.

City dwellers who fled during pandemic didn’t move far away

Remember those pandemic-era tales of people fleeing cities to work at home in more agreeable surroundings? Turns out, they didn’t go far. While a full return to office remains a distant prospect in cities like Chicago, New York and San Francisco, workers who left highly populated areas either stayed close to the city or just moved to another neighborhood, according to foot traffic analytics firm Placer.ai. “Many assumed that there would be mass exoduses from

The post City dwellers who fled during pandemic didn’t move far away appeared first on The Real Deal New York.